Sunday, September 26, 2010

A thank you note...

Many of you may remember a post I did just a couple weeks ago about Mary Lake, a Maine woman who makes (up to) a dress a day on a manual Singer sewing machine that she then gives to young girls in foster homes (you can read the post and see the video here).

After a long wedding yesterday I got home to find I had received a "thank you" card from Mary, as we had sent her a gift card (so she could pick out material and supplies she needed).

Here's a bit of it:

"I dropped off ten dresses last week and will drop off another 10 next week. Thank you for your kind and generous gift card, it will buy enough material to make (about) 30 dresses.

The small scraps of material left from making the dresses will be given to a woman how makes quilts for children in an orphanage and the large scraps will go to another woman who makes cloth dolls for little girls in Haiti.

So ALL the material will be used. Many thanks from us all."


Her words made me smile... so I read it again... and I thought of little girls dancing and spinning in their new pretty dresses.

Though I am not foolish enough to think I did anything of significance, it was Mary and her friends that took a (very) small act and turned it into something big and wonderful.



3 comments:

JW Stovall said...

"Though I am not foolish enough to think I did anything of significance, it was Mary and her friends that took a (very) small act and turned it into something big and wonderful."

You did do something of significance. You shared this story with all of us. This is the kind of thing that binds us all together....taking care of each other...Thank you for that.
Check your email to send me Mary's address, so that I can also help her make a difference. By the way, I also fired off an email to Chase Jarvis with a link to this post. He cares deeply about making a difference, in situations like these.

Jay

spartanmike said...

As if your image wasn't powerful enough, that story was something else. Great composition in that photo, how did you freeze the background but blur the motion of the little girl?

Michael Ronzetti
http://mikesgreatphotos.blogspot.com/

half blind said...

Wonderful.